Inis Mor Island 2019-05-20T11:14:35+00:00

Inis Mór Island

Inis Mór (Inishmore) meaning “Big Island” is the largest and most travelled to of the Aran Islands. The population of Inis Mór is about 900 people and it is about 14 km by 3.8 km.

The famous rocky landscape of Inis Mór has helped to create its iconic image of an island, divided by fields separated by winding stone walls. The stunning views from this Island reveal an Atlantic gateway from Connemara to Clare.

Traditional Irish culture is alive and well on Inis Mór with nightly music sessions. The Aran Islands are one of the last places in Ireland that have preserved the Irish language.

The main harbour Cill Rónán (Kilronan Village) where the ferry arrives is a bustling port. There are several pubs, restaurants, and cafes. Visitors can travel around the island by bicycle, mini-bus and pony & trap tours. There are beaches that ribbon the coastline of Inis Mór where you can enjoy picnicking, fishing, and even have a swim!

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BOOKING OPTIONS

INIS MÓR FERRY

DEPART DOOLINDEPART ISLAND
10:0011:30*
13:00* overnight / one ways only16:00
14:30* overnight / one ways only

THINGS TO SEE ON INIS MÓR

FORTS & RUINS — DÚN AONGHASA (DUN AENGUS)

This means Fort of Aengus and is the most famous attraction on the Islands. This magnificent fort is a semi-circular structure that rests on the edge of a high cliff, rising 100 metres out of the Atlantic Ocean. This is the largest of the prehistoric ruins on the Aran Islands. The fort is about a 900 metre hike from the Visitor Centre to the base of the rise. After visiting the centre the fort is about a 10 minute climb up to reach the top. So please be sure to have appropriate footwear.

ARAN HERITAGE CENTRE

This centre is located just beyond the village of Kilronan. The past and present lifestyles of Aran’s people are documented here using charts, photographs and maps.

NA SEACHT DTEAMPAILL (THE SEVEN CHURCHES)

Despite its name these remains are comprised of two small churches and several domestic buildings. This was a well-known place of pilgrimage in the West of Ireland in its time. The monastic settlement founded by Dísert Bhreacáin rivalled the St. Enda’s settlement on the east side of Inis Mór.

CLOCHAN NA CARRAIGE

This stone structure is a beehive shaped hut and is the best preserved of many similar huts on the Island. These structures were used as a place of isolation and punishment for the Hermit Monks on the Island in that period.

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